Newsletter December 2014

The Conlan School Course Guide

The Conlan School Course Guide demonstrates the broad range of study programmes we can offer you and your students. Through our ever growing network of contacts in the business and educational community, our aim is to provide experiences that will expand knowledge and increase confidence within the culture of Wales and the UK. We hope that during your time with us you and your students can progress personally and positively in every aspect of life!

Please, click here to download "The Conlan School Course Guide"!

Events in North Wales Christmas 2014: Santa Trains
Travel though the beautiful scenery of Snowdonia. Ffestiniog trains offer an authentic Victorian experience with staff in period costume and run between Porthmadog and Tan-y-Bwlch on 13/14 and 20/21 December. Santa and his elves pass through the train giving out presents to the children during the journey and Adults can relax with a glass of sherry and a mince pie on the ride back.
The Ffestiniog Railway is the oldest independent railway company in the world, established in 1832.
The railway takes you on a 13½-mile journey from the harbour in Porthmadog to the slate-quarrying town of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Our historic trains climb over 700 feet from sea level into the mountains through tranquil pastures and magnificent forests, past lakes and waterfalls, round horseshoe bends (even a complete spiral) clinging to the side of the mountain or even tunnelling through it.

www.visitwales.com

Last group of work experience students 2014
Next week sees the end of our very last work experience group of 2014 in Chester.
The seven students, from Paris, arrived in Chester at the end of November and have embarked on a 4 week work placement in the retail sector.
Our fantastic seven have provided invaluable support to a number of retail shops in the city; feedback from their employers, and host families alike, has been admirable. Their enthusiastic approach to all aspects of the programme has provided them with much satisfaction and helped towards building useful skills relevant to the sector they want to go into and very beneficial to their personal development.

Delta – Staff Development
We have recently reported on some of the teacher development workshops that have been going on in the centres, but in addition to this, the academic management have embarked on higher qualifications too. Carla Owen in Chester is currently enrolled on a Masters in EFL and Yvonne Gregory in Abergele has chosen the Delta course. The latter is a course that consists of three modules to be completed over 2-3 years and tests the candidates to the absolute maximum. It has a high reputation in the EFL world as a qualification that proves a high level of knowledge, teaching ability and language skills. Yvonne has been studying intensively now for three months to prepare for the Module 1 exam and has improved and updated her knowledge of all the current teaching methodologies, in-depth language knowledge, paying attention to individual students’ needs and making the most of classroom materials, amongst many other things. She acknowledges that it has been a tough three months or real effort but that the knowledge gained has been well worth the extra work. The exam for this part of the qualification was taken this week in Manchester so let’s keep our fingers crossed for a good result. Watch this space for other staff development updates.

Phrase of the month: Have a bone to pick
The phrase “Have a bone to pick” is used when a person is annoyed by someone and they want to talk to that person about it – “I have a bone to pick with you…”
The origins of this phrase are said to date back to the 16th Century and refer to a dog chewing on a bone for a very long time and picking it clean. The phrase is therefore used when a subject requires some considerable discussion or debate.
So, if someone tells you they have “a bone to pick with you” then be prepared for some debate!
It has a slightly different meaning here in Ireland. “I have a bone to pick with you” means “I believe you have done me wrong and I want to know why”.

www.phrases.org.uk